A Pro’s Probiotic Salad

Well, you don’t have to be a pro to make this–in fact its the easiest version of itself! Ever considered pickling (fermenting) your veggies? The point is that EVERYONE can be a pro at it!

I like yogurt, but I know it’s not the best thing for me. Dairy is highly acidic, mucus forming, and, contrary to popular belief, not the ideal source of calcium and healthy bacteria. I won’t give it up—man, I love my cheese—and I understand that it does provide certain benefits (even if the drawbacks outweigh them biochemically). Luckily, you can get all the healthy bacteria / probiotics you need from plant sources. That’s where fermentation comes in.

Fermenting vegetables increases their vitamins and digestibility, providing anti-carcinogenic and antibiotic benefits as well as increasing the proliferation of healthy flora in the intestines. They are a great addition to your daily diet. I take a probiotic supplement every morning on an empty stomach, but its nice to know you can nix to supplement for something a bit more real.

DIY Fermented Red Cabbage

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Ingredients:

– 1 red cabbage

– 2-3 tbsp sea salt

– room temperature water

Directions:

Peel off about 2-3 whole cabbage leaves before chopping. We will use them later to cap the top of the glass jar.

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Next chop the rest of the cabbage into thin strips and throw into a bowl.

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Add the salt and toss until evenly distributed.

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Begin to stuff glass jars with the cabbage.

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Use the end of a wooden spoon and literally smash the cabbage, pounding it down so there are no air spaces. You want the cabbage to be as condensed in the jar as possible.

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When there is only a few inches free at the top of the jar, pour water into the jar, making sure it trickles to the bottom of the jar. Pour until the water just reaches the top layer of the cabbage.

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Use the whole leaves of the red cabbage you set aside at the beginning, fold one or two per jar, and use them as a sort of seal.

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Immediately seal and store in a dry place with a stable temperature around 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

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And make sure to label the jars so you know what day you made them!

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Three to five days later….

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See the bubbles?

Store in the refrigerator after opening. Toss in a salad, sandwich or eat all on its own.

I’ll show you how I use it in other posts throughout the week.

Bon apetit!

xo Aylin

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  • Ventureall

    Do you boil and cool water before using in the recipe?

    • http://www.glowkitchen.com Aylin

      No, you can if you’d like, but I’ve never done so. Using filtered water is just fine as well.

  • Fred

    Looks like a great recipe which I will try, shortly. Thoroughly enjoyed your “About” description. Thanks for everything.

    • http://www.glowkitchen.com Aylin

      Thanks for visiting!