Celeriac Mash

Celeriac (celery root) doesn’t get the credit it deserves – maybe because it’s an ugly looking fella. However, through much courting, it has worked its way up to becoming one of my favorite and most versatile ingredients. By itself, it’s subtle, but its distinct flavor (tastes like a combination of celery and parsley) is something you can never tire of regardless of how it’s cooked. Like when enjoying most vegetables, I usually have celeriac when lightly sautéed with butter and seasoned with salt and pepper. Today, I decided to make a mashed version of it with the addition of some thyme, mustard, and garlic. The verdict: speaks for itself.

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Like mashed potatoes, only sans the cream and butter and excess carbs.

And while celeriac my not look like it glows on the outside, its true beauty is skin deep.

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Celeriac: is high in fiber, potassium, magnesium, and vitamin B6, is beneficial for the lymphatic, nervous, and urinary systems, acts as an effective diuretic, enhances digestion, contains a good amount of vitamin C, maintains body functions such as blood flow,  promotes bone health, lowers cholesterol levels, helps with insomnia, and is a good source of folate and vitamin K.

Celeriac Mash

by Aylin @ Glow Kitchen

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Keywords: boil vegan vegetarian fat-free celeriac thyme

Ingredients (Serves 2-3)

  • 2 celery roots (celeriac)
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme, stemmed
  • 1 tsp mustard
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp pepper

Instructions

Stem and skin the celeriac. Chop into halves and place in boiling water until tender – approximately 10 minutes. To check if the pieces have cooked through, poke with a fork and it should go through to the other side fairly easily. The pieces, however, should not be so tender that they break apart.

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Drain the liquid and place the celeriac in a bowl with the other ingredients. Mash until all is mixed properly and the result is still chunky.

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Serve and enjoy! This side dish is so fragrant and delicious – you won’t miss Mr. Potato.

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Bon Appetit!

xo Aylin

Maple Kabocha

Nothing beats a bitter cold Winter day like the comfort of baked squash and the scent of caramelized maple syrup. The result is warm, satisfying, and absolutely healthy. Kabocha is a lighter, less starchy squash than butternut, but it cooks and complements very much the same way in recipes. I think it’s best eaten as simple as possible – baked with butter – but when channeling Winter comfort, nothing hits the spot like the addition of maple syrup.

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Its color glows, but so too will you!

Kabocha Squash: is low in calories and carbohydrates, is a great source of beta-carotene, which can be converted to vitamin A in the body, promotes healthy white blood cells for good immunity and night vision, provides 70% of the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A in one cup, contributes to healthy hair and skin, is anti-inflammatory, and is packed with fiber.

Maple Kabocha

by Aylin @ Glow Kitchen

Ingredients (2 servings)

  • 1 kabocha squash
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
  • Dash of salt
  • Raisins for garnish

Instructions

Slice kabocha into even sized pieces, about 1-inch thick and several inches long. Place on a baking sheet and coat all the pieces evenly on both sides with olive oil and maple syrup. Dash with salt.

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After baking in the oven at 400 degrees Fahrenheit for approximately 25 minutes, the kabocha is ready! The scent of caramelized maple syrup is out of this world.

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Serve with a garnish of raisins.

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Enjoy! Tender, warm, and hits the spot on a cold Winter’s day.

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Bon Appetit!

xo Aylin